EEOC's New Accommodation For Those Who Are Deaf

My last post a few days ago dealt with deafness and reasonable accommodation under the ADA.

Coincidentally (and illustrating the fact that reasonable accommodations for those who are deaf do, in fact, exist), the EEOC just announced that it is “launching a new service that will enable individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing whose primary language is American Sign Language (ASL) to communicate directly with agency staff about issues of discrimination they may be facing. EEOC information intake representatives who are fluent in ASL will be available to answer questions and guide callers through the process of filing a charge of discrimination using videophones.”

Adult, Cell, Face, Female, Girl, Happy

“Previously, individuals who were deaf and or hard of hearing relied on an interpreter using relay services when they contacted EEOC. This new system provides direct access to an EEOC employee who can answer the caller’s question in ASL over a videophone.”

Deaf and of hard of hearing callers can access the toll free ASL direct video line at 844-234-5122, between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

Posted in
Richard Cohen

Richard Cohen

Richard B. Cohen is a partner in the New York City office of FisherBroyles, LLP, a national law firm. Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States. Email Richard at [email protected]