"Why So Much Fuss Over Black Employees' Hair?"

This is the title of my new Above The Law post.

I just read a great piece in the New York Times, entitled “Why Are Black People Still Punished for Their Hair?” by Ría Tabacco Mar, which had as a sub-heading: “Only black people are shamed when they choose to wear hairstyles consistent with their natural hair texture.”

She described watching a video of a Black student in Louisiana crying because her box braided hair apparently “violated a dress code prohibition against ‘unnatural’ hair styles” and she was made to leave school.  As Ms. Mar says, “the braids included hair extensions. Extensions are sometimes used in black hairstyles, like braids, that don’t require the use of damaging chemical straighteners.”

She noted that “a 6-year-old black boy in Florida was barred from school because of his locs, also known as dreadlocks.”

This lead to a discussion of an important EEOC lawsuit about race and hair.

Read the entire post here.

 

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Richard Cohen

Richard Cohen

Richard B. Cohen is a partner in the New York City office of FisherBroyles, LLP, a national law firm. Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States. Email Richard at [email protected]