Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

New York Sexual Harassment Prevention Measures Mean Business

Hey New York employers! It’s been a minute since we’ve discussed the extensive sexual harassment prevention measures that New York State has implemented. I have updates. Earlier this year, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law an amendment to the New York State Human Rights Law requiring that the New York State Division of…
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Explaining Some Employment Implications of Overturning Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade on June 24, 2022 poses countless legal questions and presents serious challenges for stakeholders, including employers. What does employment law have to do with abortion rights, you might ask. Well, I’ll tell you, and I’ll tell you something else: the ramifications…
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“Let’s Just Hire An Intern… .” Employers, It’s Not That Simple

Few unpaid internships comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), yet they seem to be ubiquitous. One study cited one million unpaid internships per year, according to an estimate from the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “First, there’s the baseline expectation of paying your dues, rather than being paid for…
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Companies Confounded by RTO Conflicts

RTO or “return to work” issues continue to plague employers. Executives tend to want workers to come into the workplace, and employees collectively respond “Meh. We’ll see.” Employers, I implore you to craft your RTO policies with enough flexibility to maintain that workplace culture you think you are cultivating by trying to mandate attendance in…
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A Chat With The EEOC, the NYS Division of Human Rights, and the NYC Commission on Human Rights

Last night I had the pleasure of listening to what representatives of three esteemed agencies had to say: an ADR coordinator at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or “EEOC,” the federal agency that enforces the federal anti-discrimination laws; the assistant commissioner for the New York State Division of Human Rights; and the general counsel for…
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USDOL Reminds Employers To Give Nursing Mothers At Work A Break

I nursed all three of my children when they were infants (they are horrified by this, naturally). When I returned to work, I pumped breastmilk at three – yes three – different law firms. Nothing comes as close to the terror of someone banging on your office door while you’re half-dressed and trying to pump…
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COVID-19 Vaccine Policy Exemptions—It’s a Process

The interactive process, that is. Doctors writing bogus opt-out letters. An online religious exemption package for sale with “a personalized exemption letter” and “a signed attestation of faith from Pastor David,” which my partner Eric Meyer wrote about a few weeks ago. Bogus claims that a drug that treats parasitic worms in livestock as a…
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Careful With Those Return To Work Policies

I had the pleasure this week of speaking with Washington Post Work Advice columnist Karla Miller about pitfalls that employers face when creating return-to-work policies. Karla was asked why parents could continue to work remotely but not workers on the same team without young children—could this be discrimination? Well, it depends. When it comes to…
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Flexibility Is Key To “Coaxing” Workers Back to the Office

Reading “They Want You Back In the Office, How to coax corporate America to return to work?” on Sunday, I thought to myself “oh good, this will address incentives and COVID-19 vaccines, the provision of paid sick leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), and, of course, ideas on flexibility to coax back…
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Employers—Do You Want To Talk About These New COBRA Subsidies or Emotional Support Animals In The Workplace?

Yeah, I know, let’s talk about the adorable animals your employees want to bring in to work. That’s tomorrow, but first, a word about COBRA under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA). As we have parsed through new paid sick and medical leave language under this new law, on April 7, 2021, the…
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AMY EPSTEIN GLUCK
Amy Epstein Gluck has represented individuals and corporate clients in Virginia, Washington, D.C., and various federal district courts for more than twenty years. Ms. Epstein Gluck’s current practice areas include employment law—advising on and drafting employment agreements; handling employment negotiations, severance agreements, noncompete and nondisclosure agreements, “wrongful terminations” and other EEO matters; representation at the EEOC level; advising employers about discrimination laws and how to remain in compliance, and employment negotiations.

Gluck Epstein, Amy BW Gray

RICHARD COHEN
Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States.

Richard Cohen Fisher Broyles

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