FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Holy Moly! Whopping $21.5 Million Verdict Because She Couldn't Work On Sunday "Because Sunday I Honor God”

We have published many posts about the tension between religion beliefs and practices and an employer’s right to reasonable control of the workplace.  This tension is, of course, addressed in Title VII which prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of, among many things, religion. Indeed, it is fair to state that Title VII created that…
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Corporate Appearance Policies Versus Religious Practices: A Delicate Legal Balance

An enormous new settlement of a religious discrimination case brought by the EEOC presents a perfect opportunity to reprise an old post with a new addition. Can an employer fire someone for wearing a veil or hijab? Or a turban? Having dreadlocks? Does a corporate policy on employee appearance trump religious dress or grooming requirements?…
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You Cannot Wear A Skirt! Revisiting Workplace Religious Discrimination

The newly-announced settlement of a religious discrimination lawsuit brought by the EEOC gives us the opportunity to revisit workplace religious discrimination – a hot topic these days. “Georgia Blue,” a Mississippi restaurant, had a dress code requiring servers to wear blue jean pants.  A newly-hired Apostolic Pentecostal employee, whose religious belief requires women to wear only…
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Psst…did you know it was Disability Awareness Month?

By:  Amy Epstein Gluck Well, it is! And, in honor of that, I bring you a new law affecting most New York City employers, at least those with more than four employees. The law applies to all of your employees, whether full- or part-time, interns (paid or unpaid), temps, and protects more NYC employees than…
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"All Associates To Bible Study Class Now – Its Mandatory!"

The religious discrimination cases which get reported involve, typically, an employee whose religious beliefs require certain dress or grooming which contravenes a company’s “look policy,” or an employee whose religious beliefs and practices require certain days or time off. Here’s a twist:  What about a case where an employee, who does not share the religious…
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Religious Discrimination In The Workplace: Both Flavors

We’ve written before that cases of religious discrimination in the workplace generally come in two flavors (not always, of course):  employers prohibiting religious garb or religious grooming, or discriminating as to an employee’s observance of religious beliefs. Well, a new EEOC lawsuit and a new EEOC settlement illustrate both situations nicely.  And also the need for reasonable accommodations…
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What’s With This Fetish About Pants? A Look At Workplace Dress Codes

Now that winter has turned into summer — overnight — the issue of clothes at work is front and center. (Isn’t it?). What to wear? No tie? Sandals? Tube top? The question is asked a lot: Is there any regulation of what an employer can require by way of dress and grooming? The answer: Not…
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“Mark of the Devil” Reappears  

Not long ago I reported about a case that may soon be heard by the Supreme Court: a religious discrimination suit brought by the EEOC against a Pennsylvania coal company for refusing to accommodate (and forcing to retire) an Evangelical Christian who had been an employee for 35 years. Initially I wondered – an employee…
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Mandatory Bible Study: At Work?

Just the other day I posted about a religious discrimination suit brought by the EEOC against a Pennsylvania coal company for refusing to accommodate an Evangelical Christian who had been an employee for 35 years.  He was fired for refusing to use a biometric hand scanner which tracks employee time and attendance, claiming that there was…
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Mark of The Beast: To The Supreme Court?

Way back in 2015 I reported on a religious discrimination suit brought by the EEOC against a Pennsylvania coal company for refusing to accommodate (and forcing to retire) an Evangelical Christian who had been an employee for 35 years. An employee for 35 years – and suddenly a problem involving his religious beliefs?  Huh? New…
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RICHARD COHEN
Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States.

Richard Cohen Fisher Broyles

AMY EPSTEIN GLUCK
Amy Epstein Gluck has represented individuals and corporate clients in Virginia, Washington, D.C., and various federal district courts for more than twenty years. Ms. Epstein Gluck’s current practice areas include employment law—advising on and drafting employment agreements; handling employment negotiations, severance agreements, noncompete and nondisclosure agreements, “wrongful terminations” and other EEO matters; representation at the EEOC level; advising employers about discrimination laws and how to remain in compliance, and employment negotiations.

Amy Gluck Fisher Broyles