Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Fisher Broyles Firm blog

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Low Hanging Fruit: Take 967

Ok, this is a little different than the usual. Only a little. This particular health care provider which the EEOC nailed for $950,000 provides such care nationwide for jails and corrections facilities, not the public. But the takeaways are the same. I hope readers can by now in my refrain: “the EEOC likes to target health…
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Disabled Employees and Harassing Coworkers: Significant New Decision

Well, it took a while but the federal circuit appeals court in NY just joined it “sister circuits” and held that “hostile work environment claims are cognizable under the ADA.” What does this mean? Title VII provides that it “shall be an unlawful employment practice for an employer to fail or refuse to hire or to…
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Vet With Service Dog Denied Employment: Was Company Asking The EEOC To Sue It?

There appears to be a new category of cases where the EEOC may be targeting employers who discriminate:  veterans with disabilities. Why? The employers are easy targets.  You know:  “low hanging fruit.” I already posted last week about the EEOC going after “fat, juicy targets”: My review of the cases brought by the EEOC in the last few years leads…
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The EEOC sees health care folks as fat, juicy targets in disability cases

It’s been some time now since I’ve written about the EEOC and “low hanging fruit” – so let me explain to new readers. My review of the cases brought by the EEOC in the last few years leads me to believe that the EEOC finds that targeting health care professionals for disability or pregnancy discrimination yields…
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So Sue Me: One MORE "Low Hanging Fruit" Case in 2018

Well, I was wrong – my post last week was not the last one of the year, as I had promised, dealing with the EEOC’s targeting of “low hanging fruit.”  That is, targeting health care providers for alleged disability law violations. These cases are coming fast and furious. The EEOC just reached a “voluntary conciliation…
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Corporate Appearance Policies Versus Religious Practices: A Delicate Legal Balance

An enormous new settlement of a religious discrimination case brought by the EEOC presents a perfect opportunity to reprise an old post with a new addition. Can an employer fire someone for wearing a veil or hijab? Or a turban? Having dreadlocks? Does a corporate policy on employee appearance trump religious dress or grooming requirements?…
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One more “EEOC goes after low hanging fruit” post before the new year!!

For anyone just coming upon this blog, I like to highlight a few important trends or repeated fact patterns, such as code words for “old” in age discrimination cases, or the seeming increase in the use of the “N-word” in workplaces. And one of my favorites is posting about EEOC developments involving disability or pregnancy…
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US Department of Justice: Title VII does not protect transgender employees

A big shout out to our esteemed and erudite partner Eric B. Meyer for his excellent blog post today on the status of Title VII as it pertains to gender identity, sexual orientation, and transgender employees. He begins by noting that: “Chris reported yesterday that the U. S. Department of Justice filed this brief with the…
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Nursing and health care facilities must pay $465,000 – for discriminating against disabled and pregnant employees

Have you heard this one from me before: “Chalk up another healthcare provider nabbed by the EEOC for allegedly violating the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”), an amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Add this to the numerous such lawsuits brought against healthcare providers under the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”).” Well,…
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Psst…did you know it was Disability Awareness Month?

By:  Amy Epstein Gluck Well, it is! And, in honor of that, I bring you a new law affecting most New York City employers, at least those with more than four employees. The law applies to all of your employees, whether full- or part-time, interns (paid or unpaid), temps, and protects more NYC employees than…
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RICHARD COHEN
Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States.

Richard Cohen Fisher Broyles

AMY EPSTEIN GLUCK
Amy Epstein Gluck has represented individuals and corporate clients in Virginia, Washington, D.C., and various federal district courts for more than twenty years. Ms. Epstein Gluck’s current practice areas include employment law—advising on and drafting employment agreements; handling employment negotiations, severance agreements, noncompete and nondisclosure agreements, “wrongful terminations” and other EEO matters; representation at the EEOC level; advising employers about discrimination laws and how to remain in compliance, and employment negotiations.

Amy Gluck Fisher Broyles