FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

FisherBroyles Employment Law Blog

Helping Employers Implement Efficient and Equitable Solutions to their Workplace Problems

Corporate Appearance Policies Versus Religious Practices: A Delicate Legal Balance

An enormous new settlement of a religious discrimination case brought by the EEOC presents a perfect opportunity to reprise an old post with a new addition. Can an employer fire someone for wearing a veil or hijab? Or a turban? Having dreadlocks? Does a corporate policy on employee appearance trump religious dress or grooming requirements?…
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Religious Discrimination In The Workplace: Both Flavors

We’ve written before that cases of religious discrimination in the workplace generally come in two flavors (not always, of course):  employers prohibiting religious garb or religious grooming, or discriminating as to an employee’s observance of religious beliefs. Well, a new EEOC lawsuit and a new EEOC settlement illustrate both situations nicely.  And also the need for reasonable accommodations…
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Religious discrimination cases are raising thorny legal issues

“Skirts, hair follicles, the flu, dreadlocks and the Mark of the Beast — say what?  Do these things have anything in common — and in an employment-law article?  They all involve employee religious beliefs or practices. We are in a period right now where religious discrimination cases are dominating headlines – indeed, where religious rights…
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Does A Corporate Dress Policy Trump Religious Grooming Requirements?

A new settlement brings to mind an old post – which bears reposting. The EEOC just settled a religious discrimination case filed against a Florida staffing company for the  hospitality industry.  It was alleged that an employee who was a Rastafarian, who wore dreadlocks as part of his sincerely held religious belief, was taken off his…
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Does A Corporate Dress Policy Trump Religious Dress Requirements?

A company that designs and manufactures automotive brake components, and its staffing agency, have just been sued by the EEOC for religious discrimination in hiring.  The facts and the issue are familiar to us, and give us a chance to review the law on accommodation of religious beliefs and practices. In this new case, the would-be…
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Workplace Religious Discrimination: The EEOC Seeks To Address A Growing Issue

The number of posts which I have written on the subject of religious discrimination keeps growing:  employers still have not learned to accommodate religious beliefs and practices, and the EEOC keeps pursuing such cases. The EEOC has just stated that “Religious discrimination remains an issue in the American workplace. In fiscal year 2015, EEOC received…
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Appearance Policies Versus Religious Practices: A Delicate Legal Balance

Since employment discrimination lawyers are seeing more and more religious discrimination cases being brought, it may be time, once again, to re-visit the subject. Can an employer fire someone for wearing a veil or hijab? Or a turban? Having dreadlocks? Growing sidelocks? Asking for time off on the Sabbath? Does a corporate policy on employee appearance…
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Great Three-Minute Overview Of Religious Discrimination in Employment

As good a short, (very) concise summary of Title VII’s prohibition against religious discrimination in employment as can be found that is useful for employers is found in Brad Reid’s Huff Post Business “The Blog,” in a three-page piece titled “A Legal Overview of Religious Discrimination in Employment.” This is a whirlwind, three-minute course on…
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The Mark Of The Beast Meets The Internal Revenue Code

Religious discrimination cases are dominating headlines – indeed, we are in a period right now where religious rights are frequently being weighed and balanced against other rights, including of course, employers’ rights, in an effort to accommodate religious beliefs — a societal and legal priority. I have often written about what used to be a Title VII…
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RICHARD COHEN
Richard Cohen has litigated and arbitrated complex corporate, commercial and employment disputes for more than 35 years, and is a trusted advisor to business owners and in-house counsel both in the United States and internationally. His clients have included Fortune 100 companies, domestic and foreign commercial and investment banks, Pacific-rim corporations and real estate development companies, as well as start-up businesses throughout the United States.

Richard Cohen Fisher Broyles

AMY EPSTEIN GLUCK
Amy Epstein Gluck has represented individuals and corporate clients in Virginia, Washington, D.C., and various federal district courts for more than twenty years. Ms. Epstein Gluck’s current practice areas include employment law—advising on and drafting employment agreements; handling employment negotiations, severance agreements, noncompete and nondisclosure agreements, “wrongful terminations” and other EEO matters; representation at the EEOC level; advising employers about discrimination laws and how to remain in compliance, and employment negotiations.

Amy Gluck Fisher Broyles